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Comparison of the magnetic resonance imaging and acoustocerebrography signals in the assessment of focal cerebral microangiopathic lesions in patients with asymptomatic atrial fibrillation. Preliminary clinical study results

pp. 83-92, vol. 19, 2016

Wioletta Dobkowska-Chudon
District Hospital, Cardiology, Poland

Miroslaw Wrobel
Sonovum AG, Leipzig, Germany

Emilia Frankowska
Radiology, Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland

Andrzej Dabrowski
Sonovum AG, Leipzig, Germany

Paweł Karlowicz
Sonomed, Warsaw, Poland

Arkadiusz Zegadlo
Radiology, Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland

Andrzej Krupienicz
Warsaw Medical University, Poland

Andrzej Nowicki
Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

Robert Olszewski
Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

Key words: ultrasounds; dispersion; brain, atrial fibrillation; stroke

Abstract: Acoustocerebrography (ACG) is a set of techniques designed to capture states of human brain tissue, and its changes. It is based on noninvasive measurements of various parameters obtained by analyzing an ultrasound pulse emitted through the human’s skull. ACG and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results were compared in a clinical study assessment of focal white-matter-lesions (WML) in the brains of patients with asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AAF). The clinical study included 55 patients (age 66.1 ± 6.7 years). According to MRI data, the patients were assigned into four groups depending on the number of lesions: L0 - 0 to 4 lesions, L5 - 5 to 9 lesions, L10 - 10 to 29 lesions, and L30 - 30 or more lesions. As a result, it has been concluded that the ACG method could clearly differentiate the groups L0 (with 0 ÷ 4 lesions) and L30 (with more than 30 lesions) of WML patients. Fisher’s Exact Test shows that this correlation is highly significant (p < 0.001). ACG seems to be a new, effective, method for detecting WML for patients with AAF and can become increasingly useful in both diagnosing, and in stratifying, them. This, in turn, can be helpful in individualizing their treatment, so that the risk of strokes may become essentially reduced.

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© Polish Acoustical Society - Gdansk Department, Polish Academy of Sciences. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported. (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)